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North Carolina residents may use the form, found here, to register to vote or update their name, address or party affiliation. After completion, please mail the signed form to the proper county board of elections office. Click here to find the mailing address of your County Board of Elections office.
To register, a person who meets the voting qualifications must sign and complete a voter registration application, found here.
This form is intended to provide notification of a voter’s request to cancel his or her voter registration. Upon submission of this form, the appropriate county board of elections will remove the voter from the county’s list of registered voters. Requested information will only be used to ensure that we are removing the correct voter.
The North Carolina Voter Registration Application, found here, may be used to change any voting information, including: name, address and party affiliation.
Some citizens, such as people serving in the military who are away from their permanent home on Election Day, their families, or U.S. citizens who are living abroad, have special voting rights and ways to register to vote. These people have the choice of either requesting a mail-in absentee ballot the same way as other registered voters, or they can apply to register and/or vote through special programs for military and overseas voters as described here.
This form is intended to provide notification of the death of a North Carolina registered voter to a county board of elections. Upon confirmation of the voter, the county board of elections will remove the voter from the county’s list of registered voters. This form may only be completed by a near relative or personal representative of the deceased voter’s estate.
The requirement to show a photo ID for voting and other associated laws has been struck down by a Federal court. Photo ID is not required to vote. Learn more here.
The voter lookup tool, located here, will allow you to check your voter registration information, see a sample ballot, or check the status of your absentee by mail ballot.
Find the answers to your voter registration questions here.

Voting Residency Facts

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Your legal voting residence is your place of permanent domicile.

That place shall be considered the residence of a person in which that person's habitation is fixed, and to which, whenever that person is absent, that person has the intention of returning.

Citizens who are homeless may register and vote.

In the event that a person's residence is not a traditional residence associated with real property, then the location of the usual sleeping area for that person shall be controlling as to the residency of that person. Residence shall be broadly construed to provide all persons with the opportunity to register and to vote, including stating a mailing address different from residence address. Voter registration forms provide a space for an applicant to visually map where they usually sleep.

You may continue to vote in your usual North Carolina county if you only temporarily relocate.

A person shall not be considered to have lost that person's residence if that person leaves home and goes into another state, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district of North Carolina, for temporary purposes only, with the intention of returning.

You may not vote in a county if you are only living in that county on a temporary basis.

A person shall not be considered to have gained a residence in any county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district of North Carolina, into which that person comes for temporary purposes only, without the intention of making that county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district a permanent place of abode.

When you move to a new county or state, you are no longer eligible to vote in your previous county.

If a person removes to another state or county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district within North Carolina, with the intention of making that state, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district a permanent residence, that person shall be considered to have lost residence in the state, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district from which that person has removed.

If you move away and establish a new residence for an indefinite period, you are no longer eligible to vote in your previous county, even if you believe that you may eventually return to your previous residence.

If a person removes to another state or county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district within North Carolina, with the intention of remaining there an indefinite time and making that state, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district that person's place of residence, that person shall be considered to have lost that person's place of residence in North Carolina, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district from which that person has removed, notwithstanding that person may entertain an intention to return at some future time.

If you move away, register and vote in another county or state, you will no longer be eligible to vote in your previous county.

If a person goes into another state, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district, or into the District of Columbia, and while there exercises the right of a citizen by voting in an election, that person shall be considered to have lost residence in that State, county, municipality, precinct, ward, or other election district from which that person removed.

College students may register and vote in the county where they are attending college (in most situations, the college student could also opt to register or remain registered at the address where they lived previous to moving away for college, and could choose to vote absentee). If a student registers at his or her school address, that registration cancels any previous registration in another county.

So long as a student intends to make the student's home in the community where the student is physically present for the purpose of attending school while the student is attending school and has no intent to return to the student's former home after graduation, the student may claim the college community as the student's domicile. The student need not also intend to stay in the college community beyond graduation in order to establish domicile there.